Low Carb Quick Pickling

Whatever diet you’re on, I think we can all agree that salads are healthy.

I think we can also agree that salads, over the course of a few days or weeks, can get boring. That is, unless you change it up a bit and apply some quick pickling of any heartier elements of the salad (e.g., cucumber, cabbage, onion, carrot). Yes, yes, low carb police, I do eat carrots sometimes but not a lot.

I’ve previously posted my salmon recipe which I usually pair with some mixed greens, tossed with raw apple cider vinegar (probiotic!) and extra virgin olive oil. I’d say I eat some variation of that salmon recipe approx. 50% of the week. It works as a combination of cooked (the veg baked with the salmon) + raw (mixed greens) vegetables.

But I have recently discovered that when you have cooked + raw + pickled, you get something super tasty and complex for your salad.

So, how do you make this all-purpose cooked/raw/pickled salad?

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  • Cooked: Cook your meat (in my case, salmon) with some veg (broccoli, zucchini, brussel sprouts, etc.) and set aside (I only cook with either organic coconut oil or grass-fed butter, as anything else would become oxidized with heat). I never ever use bad-for-you vegetable oils.
  • Raw: Rinse and set aside some mixed greens or chopped lettuce. If you need a separate blog post on that, then, um, maybe you’re not my target reader. ????
  • How to Low Carb Quick Pickle:
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    Slice up your cucumber and/or chop up your cabbage and/or onion and/or carrot and set aside in bowl.

    Add 1 part raw apple cider vinegar (I use Bragg’s) and 1 part spring water (tap water is the bane of your gut biome’s existence).

    Add coarse sea salt and xylitol (no sugar here!). How much of each depends on your taste– I like it super salty and somewhat sweet so I tend to add 3 parts salt to 1 part xylitol. In a small bowl like the one pictured below, I’d add 3 tsp of salt and 1 tsp xylitol.

    Let it marinate for at least an hour. The longer, the tastier.

    For plating, I usually do the raw element on the bottom, cooked elements in the middle, and surround it with the pickled element. I then dress the entire plate with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil at room temperature for some extra good fat.

    If you like, you can save the pickle juice for future pickling, as pouring new batches of raw apple cider vinegar every time can get expensive.

    I know this post isn’t super prescriptive like my other recipe posts– and that’s the point.  There is plenty of room for play with pickling– use what you have on hand and find what works!